Towns

Nobber

(Nobber mediveal church ruin and modern Church of Ireland church, now George Eogan Cultural and Heritage Centre: Photo, Henry Cruise)

Nobber: from the prehsitoric to the present day

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Nobber

Drogheda

Drogheda, on the Boyne is a medieval town just 20 minutes from Dublin Airport. Drogheda is the gateway to the world famous Boyne Valley region and the UNESCO World Heritage Site at Newgrange. Rich in heritage yet young at heart, the largest town in Ireland still has a village feel and a wealth of unique attractions within walking distance of each other. Drogheda derives its name from the Irish Droichead Átha meaning ‘Bridge of the Ford’. It is the largest town in Co.

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Drogheda

Navan Town

A burial site close to where the River Boyne and Blackwater meet has been identified as Dún Dubchomair, where a Viking fleet is reputed to have landed. The Anglo-Normans also recognised the importance of this location and around 1185 Joselyn de Angulo converted a nearby glacial mound into a motte and bailey castle. Legend tells that this mound was the burial site of Odhbha, the wife of éremón, a Milesian invader from Spain (link to Myths & Legends). In the later medieval period Navan was a walled town and, like Trim, was an outpost of The Pale.

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Navan Town

Trim Heritage Town

Trim contains more Medieval buildings than any town in Ireland Trim is situated on the banks of the River Boyne in an area of fertile plains. The town developed around Trim Castle, straddling the river to the north and west of the castle. In the 13th century the town was enclosed within a circuit of stone walls. Augustinian (1202), Franciscan (1260), and Dominican (1263) friaries were established, indicating the growing prosperity of the town.

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Trim Heritage Town

Oldcastle

The town of Oldcastle was the 18th century creation of the Naper family, who received parts of the Plunkett estate following the cromwellian wars. Due in part to the continuation of a Gaelic way of life, the area, suffered badly during the Great Famine (1845-‘9) in comparison with richer, more arable and more progressive areas in the southern part of Co. Meath. The poorest inhabitants were obliterated by starvation and emigration. Nonetheless, land patterns still visible today reveal a strong attachment to pastoral farming of ‘Gaelic Culture'.

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Oldcastle

Slane Village

The popular Boyne Drive passes through Slane. For those with sporting interests the Boyne provides excellent fishing. Horse-riding, racing, golf, tennis, walking and canoeing are all available locally or lie within easy driving distance. Less than 20km to the coast where there are safe sandy beaches and miles of dunes to walk. In Slane and its environs you will find an increasing number of specialist food producers, small restaurants and craft workshops-modern gems among the ancient treasures of County Meath

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Slane Village

Skryne

Skryne, or Skreen as it is officially known, is a small village situated on and around a hill. The hill is a short distance west of Tara and the area is sometimes referred to as the Tara/Skryne Valley. The Hill of Skryne is actually higher than its more famous neighbour at Tara. One can enjoy wonderful views of each hill from the summit of the other. In the 12th century, Hugh de Lacy granted the Barony of Skryne to his finest knight, Adam de Feipo. He subdivided it and granted twenty of his followers with land grants.

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Skryne
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