Historic Sites | Discover Boyne Valley

Historic Sites

Newtown Trim Monuments

The Newtown Monuments consist of a large medieval cathedral, two monasteries and small church which mostly date from the early 13th century. They are situated just downriver from the town of Trim, separated by the medieval open field system known as the Porchfields.

 

St Peter & St Paul Cathedral and Victorine Priory

+ 353(0)469437227
trimvisitorcentre@discoverboynevalley.ie

Newtown,

Trim,

Co. Meath

From M1 Motorway

At junction 10, take the N51 exit.

Continue onto R161 & continue onto Trim

From Navan

Take the 1st exit onto Railway Street & continue onto R161 & continue onto Trim

From Drogheda

At the roundabout, take the 1st exit onto N51 Continue onto R161 & & continue onto Trim

From Dublin M3

Continue onto Navan Road/N3, take exit onto R156

Merge onto M3, At junction 6, take the R125 exit

Continue to follow R154 towards Trim.

Newtown Trim is located on the north side of the road about two kilometres before Trim.

Free entry. Please respect Newtown as it is still in use as a burial ground. Dogs must be kept on leads.

53.55571755550373
-6.772506654180335

Slane Castle

Overlooking the River Boyne, just a few kilometres upstream from Newgrange and the site of the famous Battle of the Boyne, Slane Castle in its existing form was constructed under the direction of William Burton Conyngham, together with his nephew the 1st Marquess Conyngham. The reconstruction dates back to 1785 and is principally the work of James Gandon, James Wyatt and Francis Johnston. Francis Johnston was also the architect responsible for the gothic gates on the Mill Hill, located to the east of the castle.

+353 (0) 41 988 4477
info@slanecastle.ie

Slane Castle,

Slane,

Co. Meath.

C15 XP83

See www.slanecastle.ie for up-to-date opening hours.

https://www.facebook.com/officialslanecastle

See www.slanecastle.ie for up-to-date admission costs.

53.7098
-6.56143

St Laurence's Gate & Drogheda Walls

Drogheda's name derives from the Irish Droichead Átha meaning 'bridge of the ford' which refers to the River Boyne on which it stands. Drogheda was granted its charter in 1194 by Hugh de Lacy (after whom the de Lacy bridge in Drogheda is named).

The Anglo-Normans made Drogheda one of their primary strongholds, completing the town walls in 1334. The walled area of the mediaeval Drogheda enclosed 113 acres, making it one of the largest walled towns of the time.

+353 41 9872843
droghedatouristoffice@gmail.com

Laurence Street,

Drogheda

Co. Louth

The gate may be viwed free of charge at the end of St Laurance Street, right in the centre of Drogheda. There is no entry to the gate structure.

53.7159321303655
-6.346976752879503

St. Colmcille's House

St Colmcille's House probably dates from the early 10th century and is characteristic of an oratory from that period. Access to the monks' sleeping accommodation aloft is by a (modern) ladder. The Oratory is kept locked.

St. Colmcille's House is open for visitors upon request (please contact the Kells Courthouse Tourism and Cultural Hub beforehand to arrange a visit, and give 24hrs notice)

+353 (0) 46 9247508
kellscourthouse@discoverboynevalley.ie

Church Lane,

Kells,

Co. Meath

53.72828251706032
-6.880749624539207

St. Peter`s Church Drogheda

St. Peter's Church Is among the finest Gothic Revival Churches in Ireland and is famous for housing the shrine of St. Oliver Plunkett. The first church on this site was constructed in 1791, and the present one - built in the 1880's - incorporates elements of the earlier structure. The imposing façade is built of local limestone. The lavish interior includes a special chapel which houses the preserved head of St. Oliver Plunkett (1625 – 81), the last Catholic martyr to die in England.

+353 (0)41 9872843
droghedatouristoffice@gmail.com

St Peter's Roman Catholic Church,

West Street,

Drogheda,

Co. Louth,

A92 A068.

Rail

Drogheda is serviced by both Intercity (Dublin/ Belfast) and Suburban trains (Dublin/Drogheda/ Dundalk) with trains departing approximately every half hour from 07:30 - 23:20 daily.

For more info see www.irishrail.ie or call +353 (0) 41 9838749.

Bus

Drogheda is serviced by both Intercity (Dublin/Dundalk/ Belfast) and Suburban bus services (Dublin/ Drogheda/ Dundalk),in addition to other national routes, with buses departing from 07:15 - 00:00 daily.

For more info visit www.buseireann.ie or call +353(0) 41 9835023.

By Car

From the North Take the M1 south to Drogheda and exit at the N52 / Drogheda off-ramp (immediately before the M1 Boyne bridge) and follow the signs for town centre.

From the south: take the M1 north to Drogheda and exit at the N52 / Drogheda off-ramp (immediately after the M1 Boyne bridge) and follow the signs for town centre.

From the west: take the N52 via Navan / Slane, cross over the M1 (with the M1 Boyne bridge to the south) and follow the signs for town centre.

Once in the town Turn on to West Street (adjacent to the Bridge of Peace)

For up-to-date opening hours and Mass times see www.saintpetersdrogheda.ie

https://www.facebook.com/StPetersParishDrogheda
53.7149
-6.35242

The Tomb of the Jealous Man & Woman

In the cemetery of St. Peter and Paul`s Cathedral you will discover an impressive altar tomb dating from around 1592. The tomb known locally as “the Jealous man and Woman” is the resting place of Sir Lucas Dillon and his wife Lady Jane Bathe.

Newtown, Trim, Co. Meath

From Trim:

Head south on Castle Street. At the roundabout take the 2nd exit onto R154 to Dublin /Clonee. Take the first left about 1.5km down the road. Going across the bridge go left when you pass Marcie Regan's pub. Destination will be on the left.

From Navan:

Head east on Kells Road towards Dublin. Turn right onto Circular Road. At the roundabout, take the 1st exit onto Railway Street. Continue onto R161 until you arrive in Trim. Turn left onto R154. At the roundabout, take the 1st exit onto R154 to Dublin /Clonee. Take the first left about 1.5km down the road. Going across the bridge go left when you pass Marcie Regan's pub. Destination will be on the left. Via M1 Motorway or Drogheda: Take the M1 (this road is tolled) coming from Belfast. At junction 10, take the N51 exit to Drogheda (North)/Navan/Collon. At the roundabout, take the 1st exit onto N51 for Slane. Continue on the N51 to Navan. Turn left onto Kells Road heading towards Dublin. Turn right onto Circular Road. At the roundabout, take the 1st exit onto Railway Street. Continue onto R161 until you arrive in Trim. Turn left onto R154. At the roundabout, take the 1st exit onto R154 to Dublin /Clonee. Take the first left about 1.5km down the road. Going across the bridge go left when you pass Marcie Regan's pub. Destination will be on the left.

From Dublin:

Take the M3 (this road is tolled) headed for Cavan. At junction 6, take the R125 exit to Dunshaughlin/Trim. At the roundabout, take the 1st exit onto R125. At the roundabout, take the 2nd exit ontoR125/R154. Continue to follow R154 until you reach the outskirts of Trim. Take the last right before the roundabout. Going across the bridge go left when you pass Marcie Regan's pub. Destination will be on the left.

53.55578544903598
-6.771338647932288

Trim Castle

Trim Castle is the largest, best-preserved & most impressive Anglo-Norman castle in Ireland. Trim get its name from the Irish Baile Átha Troim, meaning ‘Town of the Ford of the Elder Trees', indicating that this was an important fording point on the River Boyne. Such was the significance of this crossing point that by the fifth century a chieftain's dún (fort) and an early monastery were sited here. Trim Castle was built In 1172, shortly after the arrival of the Anglo-Normans in Ireland.

+ 353 (0) 46 943 8619
trimcastle@opw.ie

Castle Street,
Trim,
Co Meath,
C15 HN90.

From M1 Motorway

At junction 10, take the N51 exit.

Continue onto R161 & continue onto Trim

 

From Navan

Take the 1st exit onto Railway Street & continue onto R161 & continue onto Trim

 

From Drogheda

At the roundabout, take the 1st exit onto N51

Continue onto R161 & & continue onto Trim

From Dublin M3

Continue onto Navan Road/N3, take exit onto R156

Merge onto M3, At junction 6, take the R125 exit

Continue to follow R154

Take exit onto Castle Street

Turn right & destination will be on the right

October
09:30 – 16:30
 
November - early February
Weekends only
09:00 – 16:00
Tours of Castle Grounds
Mon-Friday
09:00 – 13:30
 
early February - 16 March
09:30 – 16:30
 
17 March - 30 September

10:00 – 17:00

https://www.facebook.com/trimcastleopw/

Guided tour of the Keep (weekends)
Adult: €5.00
Group/Senior: €4.00
Child/Student: €3.00
Family: €13.00

Castle Grounds (weekends)
Free of charge

Midweek Tours of Castle Grounds (Nov-Feb): €2 per person

 

Parking: Public car park close to the site (paid parking with a 2 hour limit)

53.5548
-6.78976

Trim Heritage Town

Medieval Trim

Trim contains more medieval buildings than any town in Ireland. Trim is situated on the banks of the River Boyne in an area of fertile plains. The town developed around Trim Castle, straddling the river to the north and west of the castle. In the 13th century the town was enclosed within a circuit of stone walls. Augustinian (1202), Franciscan (1260), and Dominican (1263) friaries were established, indicating the growing prosperity of the town.

+ 353 (0) 46 943 7227
trimvisitorcentre@discoverboynevalley.ie

Trim Visitor Centre, 

Castle Street,

Trim

C15 TXA5

From M1 Motorway

At junction 10, take the N51 exit.

Continue onto R161 & continue onto Trim

From Navan

Take the 1st exit onto Railway Street & continue onto R161 & continue onto Trim

From Drogheda

At the roundabout, take the 1st exit onto N51

Continue onto R161 & & continue onto Trim

From Dublin M3

Continue onto Navan Road/N3, take exit onto R156

Merge onto M3, At junction 6, take the R125 exit

Continue to follow R154

Take exit onto Castle Street

Turn right & destination will be on the right

https://www.facebook.com/TrimTouristOffice
53.5548
-6.78976